Small Animals

We see and treat a wide range of small animals at Pet Vet, this includes cats, dogs and rabbits but also:-

‘Small Furries’ – guinea pigs, hamsters, chinchillas, ferrets, rats and mice;

Reptiles – tortoises, snakes, bearded dragons, chameleons, geckos;

Birds – from parrots to canaries;  

Fish – gold fish, tropical, marine and pond fish.

Find out more by clicking on the relevant section below

 

Blank - Do Not Remove
Rabbits

Insurance :

Taking out insurance for your pet is recommended. There is a large choice of companies offering pet insurance. Check the small print so you get the correct one for you.

Vaccination:

Myxomatosis and Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease (RVHD) combined vaccination from 5 weeks of age, then annually.
Rabbit Viral Haemorrhagic Disease-2 (RVHD-2) vaccination from 10 weeks of age, then 6 monthly.

Skin Parasites:

Rabbits can get a variety of skin parasites including fleas, lice and mites. We can prevent and treat these conditions. If you are concerned, contact Pet Vet to make an appointment to see the vet.

Grooming:

It is important to brush your rabbit’s hind quarters and keep it clean, especially during the summer. Failure to do this can result in Blowfly Strike, which causes maggots to eat away at the skin. This can be fatal. We have products to help you keep the flies away.

Neutering:

Males are neutered from 4 months of age. Females from 6 months of age.

Diet:

A rabbit eats grass. Feed a high quality diet such as hay (dried grass) (3 quarters of daily food intake,) e.g. Timothy Grass. Fresh vegetables and fruit, such as celery, greens, apples and a variety of garden plants including dandelions make up the other quarter of the daily food intake. Only a small amount of commercial rabbit mixes can be given to prevent rabbits from selectively feeding, which leads to obesity. Dried rabbit mixes alone are not recommended as a rabbit diet.

Water intake is fairly high at about 10% of the body weight. Drinking bottles should be kept clean and it is much better than drinking bowls as it prevents wetting of the chin.

Neonatal Care:

Rabbit milk is exceptionally nutritious and nursing is only for a few minutes once or twice a day. Owners misinterpret this as mis mothering but it is normal.

Parental bond is maintained by scent, with the doe marking her kittens with her chin and the inguinal gland secretions. Handling of the kittens can lead to mis mothering particularly during the first week of the kittens’ lives. Kittens show interest in grass / hay at 2 weeks of age and start coprophagy at 3 weeks of age. Coprophagy is the expelling of partially digested material through the anus and eating it again directly for nutritive purposes. This commences 3-8 hours after feeding.

Kittens (baby rabbits) emerge from the nest at about 2-3 weeks of age and can be weaned at 4-5 weeks of age. Handling and socialising is important at this stage in the pet rabbits’ lives.

Small Furries

By ‘Small Furries’ we include mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, degus, chinchillas, ferrets. There is a large variety for you to choose for purchasing to keep as your pet.  The specific needs for correctly looking after these vary and you will need to research what is needed before you make your selection.

Things to consider include the type and size of living accommodation needed; what care and attention will be required; what food to give, how often and how to prepare the food to ensure your pet is getting all it needs.

You must be prepared to give your pet the appropriate living environment and welfare that it needs for its particular type.

Seek advice before your purchase to make sure you are fully prepared to give your pet all it needs to have the best chance of health throughout its life.  Also ensure that you know your commitments to your pet, as they do depend on your time and attention to thrive.

Call us to arrange an appointment if you have any concerns about your pet and want to see a vet.

The Animal Welfare Act 2006 places a legal duty of care on you as their owner or keeper to provide for your animals’ welfare needs including the five welfare needs below;

Every pet owner must provide for the following needs of their pets:

  • Health – Protection from pain, injury, suffering and disease and treated if they become ill or injured.
  • Behaviour – the ability to behave naturally for their species eg. Play, run, dig, jump, fly etc.
  • Companionship – to be housed with, or apart from, other animals as appropriate for the species. i.e. company of their own kind for sociable species like rabbits or guinea pigs, or to be housed alone for solitary species like some hamsters.
  • Diet – a suitable diet. This can include feeding appropriately for the pet’s life stage and feeding a suitable amount to prevent obesity or malnourishment, as well as access to fresh clean water.
  • Environment – a suitable environment. This should include the right type of home with a comfortable place to rest and hide as well as space to exercise and explore.

The needs of each type of pet are very different and it is important you as an owner knows what these needs are, and how to meet them. Researching carefully before purchase can help you understand what you will need to provide.

Reptiles

There is a large variety of reptiles available for purchasing to keep as pets.  The specific needs for correctly looking after these vary and a good deal of research is needed before you make your selection.

Things to consider include the type and size of vivarium needed; what heating and lighting should be provided; the need for direct sunlight; what food to give, how often and how to prepare the food to ensure your reptile is getting all it needs.

You must be prepared to give your pet the appropriate living environment and welfare that it needs for its particular type.

Seek advice before your purchase to make sure you are fully prepared to give your pet all it needs to have the best chance of health throughout its life.  Also ensure that you know your commitments to your pet as they do depend on your time and attention to thrive.

At Pet Vet we offer reptile health checks with our vet. The first health check is free!

Call us to arrange an appointment if you have any concerns about your reptile and want to see a  vet.

 The Animal Welfare Act 2006 places a legal duty of care on you as their owner or keeper to provide for your animals’ welfare needs including the five welfare needs below;

Every pet owner must provide for the following needs of their pets:

  • Health – Protection from pain, injury, suffering and disease and treated if they become ill or injured.
  • Behaviour – the ability to behave naturally for their species eg. Play, run, dig, jump, fly etc.
  • Companionship – to be housed with, or apart from, other animals as appropriate for the species. i.e. company of their own kind for sociable species like rabbits or guinea pigs, or to be housed alone for solitary species like some hamsters.
  • Diet – a suitable diet. This can include feeding appropriately for the pet’s life stage and feeding a suitable amount to prevent obesity or malnourishment, as well as access to fresh clean water.
  • Environment – a suitable environment. This should include the right type of home with a comfortable place to rest and hide as well as space to exercise and explore.

The needs of each type of pet are very different and it is important you as an owner knows what these needs are, and how to meet them. Researching carefully before purchase can help you understand what you will need to provide.

Birds

From parrots to canaries, birds can be great companions given the right environment, conditions and diet. There is a large variety for you to choose for purchasing to keep as your pets.  The specific needs for correctly looking after these vary and you will need to research what is needed before you make your selection.

Things to consider include the type and size of living accommodation needed; what care and attention will be required; what food to give, how often and how to prepare the food to ensure your birds are getting all they need.

Seek advice before your purchase to make sure you are fully prepared to give your birds all they need to have the best chance of health throughout their lives.  Also ensure that you know your commitments to your birds, as they do depend on your time and attention to thrive.

Call us to arrange an appointment if you have any concerns about your birds and want to see a vet.

The Animal Welfare Act 2006 places a legal duty of care on you as their owner or keeper to provide for your animals’ welfare needs including the five welfare needs below;

Every pet owner must provide for the following needs of their pets:

  • Health – Protection from pain, injury, suffering and disease and treated if they become ill or injured.
  • Behaviour – the ability to behave naturally for their species eg. Play, run, dig, jump, fly etc.
  • Companionship – to be housed with, or apart from, other animals as appropriate for the species. i.e. company of their own kind for sociable species like rabbits or guinea pigs, or to be housed alone for solitary species like some hamsters.
  • Diet – a suitable diet. This can include feeding appropriately for the pet’s life stage and feeding a suitable amount to prevent obesity or malnourishment, as well as access to fresh clean water.
  • Environment – a suitable environment. This should include the right type of home with a comfortable place to rest and hide as well as space to exercise and explore.

The needs of each type of pet are very different and it is important you as an owner knows what these needs are, and how to meet them. Researching carefully before purchase can help you understand what you will need to provide.

Fish

Pet fish can be goldfish, pond fish, tropical or marine fish. There is a large variety for you to choose for purchasing to keep as your pets.  The specific needs for correctly looking after these vary and you will need to research what is needed before you make your selection.

Things to consider include the type and size of living accommodation needed; what care and attention will be required; what food to give, how often and how to prepare the food to ensure your fish are getting all they need.

Seek advice before your purchase to make sure you are fully prepared to give your fish all they need to have the best chance of health throughout their lives.  Also ensure that you know your commitments to your fish, as they do depend on your time and attention to thrive.

Call us to arrange an appointment if you have any concerns about your fish and want to see a vet.

The Animal Welfare Act 2006 places a legal duty of care on you as their owner or keeper to provide for your animals’ welfare needs including the five welfare needs below;

Every pet owner must provide for the following needs of their pets:

  • Health – Protection from pain, injury, suffering and disease and treated if they become ill or injured.
  • Behaviour – the ability to behave naturally for their species eg. Play, run, dig, jump, fly etc.
  • Companionship – to be housed with, or apart from, other animals as appropriate for the species. i.e. company of their own kind for sociable species like rabbits or guinea pigs, or to be housed alone for solitary species like hamsters.
  • Diet – a suitable diet. This can include feeding appropriately for the pet’s life stage and feeding a suitable amount to prevent obesity or malnourishment, as well as access to fresh clean water.
  • Environment – a suitable environment. This should include the right type of home with a comfortable place to rest and hide as well as space to exercise and explore.

The needs of each type of pet are very different and it is important you as an owner knows what these needs are, and how to meet them. Researching carefully before purchase can help you understand what you will need to provide.

Get in touch

If you are a client wanting to book an appointment, or if you are interested in finding out more about us, please give us call or get in touch using our online form:

Thornhill Clinic Opening Hours

Monday – Friday
9.00am – 7.00pm
Saturday
9.00am – 1.00pm
Sunday
10.00am - 11.00am

Telephone

023 80 46 36 46

Woolston Clinic Opening Hours

Monday, Wednesday & Friday
9.00am – 6.00pm
Tuesday & Thursday
9.00am - 7.00pm
Saturday
9.00am – 12.00pm
Sunday
Closed

Telephone

023 80 443 999